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I’m not big on haters but will always make an exception for vintage Werner Herzog… 

larsvontriers:

You are usually counted […] among the directors who launched the new German cinema in the nineteen-sixties and seventies. Do you agree with this?

WERNER HERZOG: It is a factual and technical coincidence. In reality, I never participated in any of their collective projects, I never shared their ideas, which I found mediocre, and I wasn’t friends with them. I grew up poor and worked in a factory, and considered them petits-bourgeois who played with the idea of world revolution and whose political analyses seemed absurd to me. At the time, I was considered a fascist for this. So I’ve always been solitary and isolated in my work. […]

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Interesting solution to racist caricature sports mascots of old: a slightly classier caricature?

Coachella Valley High settles on new ‘Mighty Arabs’ mascot

"We’re very happy with this," Ayoub said. "It’s something that could be on the murals and on the gym floor without offending anybody. It’s not a caricature based on stereotypical, Orientalist views of who Arabs are."

 (via Slideshow: Coachella Valley High settles on new ‘Mighty Arabs’ mascot | 89.3 KPCC)

Interesting solution to racist caricature sports mascots of old: a slightly classier caricature?

Coachella Valley High settles on new ‘Mighty Arabs’ mascot

"We’re very happy with this," Ayoub said. "It’s something that could be on the murals and on the gym floor without offending anybody. It’s not a caricature based on stereotypical, Orientalist views of who Arabs are."

(via Slideshow: Coachella Valley High settles on new ‘Mighty Arabs’ mascot | 89.3 KPCC)

The first published image of the koala appeared in George Perry’s (1810) natural history work Arcana.[109] Perry called it the “New Holland Sloth” on account of its perceived similarities to the Central and South American tree-living mammals of genus Bradypus. His disdain for the koala, evident in his description of the animal, was typical of the prevailing early 19th-century British attitude about the primitiveness and oddity of Australian fauna:[110]

"… the eye is placed like that of the Sloth, very close to the mouth and nose, which gives it a clumsy awkward appearance, and void of elegance in the combination … they have little either in their character or appearance to interest the Naturalist or Philosopher. As Nature however provides nothing in vain, we may suppose that even these torpid, senseless creatures are wisely intended to fill up one of the great links of the chain of animated nature …".[111]

The first published image of the koala appeared in George Perry’s (1810) natural history work Arcana.[109] Perry called it the “New Holland Sloth” on account of its perceived similarities to the Central and South American tree-living mammals of genus Bradypus. His disdain for the koala, evident in his description of the animal, was typical of the prevailing early 19th-century British attitude about the primitiveness and oddity of Australian fauna:[110]

"… the eye is placed like that of the Sloth, very close to the mouth and nose, which gives it a clumsy awkward appearance, and void of elegance in the combination … they have little either in their character or appearance to interest the Naturalist or Philosopher. As Nature however provides nothing in vain, we may suppose that even these torpid, senseless creatures are wisely intended to fill up one of the great links of the chain of animated nature …".[111]