In 1967, Ruthann Friedman became the third-ever female songwriter to write a song that reached number one on the American charts, when her pals the Association recorded her song “Windy.” 
Are we right to glorify the 60s? 
“Well, yeah. I can appreciate that because I love the music from the 60s. Though I never liked the fashion. All of a sudden we had polyester and paisleys. That’s not what it was really about. The fashionista’s idea of what having a hallucination was like is NOT what having a hallucination was like.”

(via RUTHANN FRIEDMAN: SEE THINGS AS NEW | L.A. RECORD)

In 1967, Ruthann Friedman became the third-ever female songwriter to write a song that reached number one on the American charts, when her pals the Association recorded her song “Windy.”

Are we right to glorify the 60s?
“Well, yeah. I can appreciate that because I love the music from the 60s. Though I never liked the fashion. All of a sudden we had polyester and paisleys. That’s not what it was really about. The fashionista’s idea of what having a hallucination was like is NOT what having a hallucination was like.”

(via RUTHANN FRIEDMAN: SEE THINGS AS NEW | L.A. RECORD)

"Facebook users denounce Steven Spielberg’s senseless killing of dinosaurs"
“In the genetic experiment gone horribly wrong that is Facebook, satire is the deadliest extinct species […] 
Indeed, your scientists who invented a way for far-flung people to talk to each other quickly and anonymously were so busy asking whether or not they could, they didn’t stop to think if they should.”

 (via Facebook users denounce Steven Spielberg’s senseless killing of dinosaurs · Newswire · The A.V. Club)

"Facebook users denounce Steven Spielberg’s senseless killing of dinosaurs"
“In the genetic experiment gone horribly wrong that is Facebook, satire is the deadliest extinct species […]
Indeed, your scientists who invented a way for far-flung people to talk to each other quickly and anonymously were so busy asking whether or not they could, they didn’t stop to think if they should.”

(via Facebook users denounce Steven Spielberg’s senseless killing of dinosaurs · Newswire · The A.V. Club)

Some good quotes to discover or revisit in this massive listicle, including:

Ousmane Sembène

“The role of the artist is not to say what is good, but to be able to denounce. He must feel the heartbeat of society and be able to create the image society gives to him. He can orient society, he can say it is exaggerating, going overboard, but the power to decide escapes every artist. I live in a capitalist society and I can’t go any further than the people. Those for change are only a handful, a minority, and we don’t have that Don Quixote attitude that we can transform society. One work cannot instigate change. I don’t think that in history there has been a single revolutionary work that has brought the people to create a revolution. It’s not after having read Marx or Lenin that you go out and make a revolution. It’s not after reading Marcuse in America. All the works are just a point of reference in history. And that’s all. Before the end of an act of creation, society usually has already surpassed it. All that an artist can do is bring the people to the point of having an idea of the thing, an idea in their heads that they share, and that helps. People have killed and died for an idea. If I understand your criticism, then I’m happy. I had no belief that after people saw Mandabi, they would go out and make a revolution. But people liked the film and talked about it, though my government didn’t. They wanted to censor the movie at the point where it said that ‘Honesty is a crime in Senegal.’ People discussed Mandabi in the post office or in the market and decided they were not going to pay out their money like the person in my movie. They reported those trying to victimize them, which led to many arrests. But when they denounced the crooks, they would say it was not the person but the government which was corrupt. And they would say they were going to change the country. I know my own limits. But through nothing more than just supplying these people with ideas, I am participating in their awareness.”

(via Famous Directors’ Filmmaking Advice – Flavorwire)

Some good quotes to discover or revisit in this massive listicle, including:

Ousmane Sembène

“The role of the artist is not to say what is good, but to be able to denounce. He must feel the heartbeat of society and be able to create the image society gives to him. He can orient society, he can say it is exaggerating, going overboard, but the power to decide escapes every artist. I live in a capitalist society and I can’t go any further than the people. Those for change are only a handful, a minority, and we don’t have that Don Quixote attitude that we can transform society. One work cannot instigate change. I don’t think that in history there has been a single revolutionary work that has brought the people to create a revolution. It’s not after having read Marx or Lenin that you go out and make a revolution. It’s not after reading Marcuse in America. All the works are just a point of reference in history. And that’s all. Before the end of an act of creation, society usually has already surpassed it. All that an artist can do is bring the people to the point of having an idea of the thing, an idea in their heads that they share, and that helps. People have killed and died for an idea. If I understand your criticism, then I’m happy. I had no belief that after people saw Mandabi, they would go out and make a revolution. But people liked the film and talked about it, though my government didn’t. They wanted to censor the movie at the point where it said that ‘Honesty is a crime in Senegal.’ People discussed Mandabi in the post office or in the market and decided they were not going to pay out their money like the person in my movie. They reported those trying to victimize them, which led to many arrests. But when they denounced the crooks, they would say it was not the person but the government which was corrupt. And they would say they were going to change the country. I know my own limits. But through nothing more than just supplying these people with ideas, I am participating in their awareness.”

(via Famous Directors’ Filmmaking Advice – Flavorwire)

theartling

ART JOURNAL @ Art Basel, Basel 2014

Love me some Ming Wong GIFs…

theartling:

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A DAY WITH… AN ARTIST
MING WONG

“Western films exist as an extension of photography, whereas Japanese films are more extensions of Kabuki, Noh, and other traditional performing arts”.

Born in Singapore in 1971, Ming Wong is currently based in Berlin. He is known for his unique artistic approach, in which he places himself into reconstructions of emblematic masterpieces of World Cinema. For this exhibition, Ming Wong presents his first work created while living in Japan, Me in Me, comprised of a series of short films inspired by Japanese film and traditional performing arts. In Me in Me, Ming Wong classifies Japanese films into the three genres of “historical”, “modern” and “animated” and in the various scenes attempts to recreate the archetypal characters of each. Playing all of these characters himself, he uses the distinctive performance, camera work, and narrative-setting of these three cinematic worlds to express representative aspects of Japanese film.

~ Excerpt from Me in Me catalogue, foreword by the Shiseido Corporate Culture Department

Read More

theartling

New Exhibition: Cicadas Cicadas by Genevieve Chua

theartling:

image

Cicadas #5, Castanets

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Cicadas #4, Castanets

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Born in 1984, Genevieve graduated with a Diploma in Fine Arts (Painting) from LASALLE College of the Arts, Singapore in 2004. Genevieve works on an unfurling narrative in which the wilderness takes the form of a nebulous feminine creature that repossesses the city by flooding. Informed by Southeast Asian superstition and horror, the works are contingent realities presented as installations, images and objects.

In Singapore, selected solo exhibitions include at the Singapore Biennale 2011, Objectifs, M1 Singapore Fringe Festival 2009, and National Museum of Singapore 2009. She was a recipient of the NAC Georgette Chen Scholarship 2003/4 and the Young Artist Award in 2012 conferred by the National Arts Council Singapore.

The artist is represented by STPI (Singapore), Gallery EXIT (Hong Kong) and Gusford Gallery (Los Angeles).  www.genchua.com

Read More

wandrlust
See also: 
social-pool.comhttp://www.social-pool.com/

wandrlust:

Big Surf

Arizona’s Big Surf is one of those projects that belong to the era of post-war boosterism and the unassailable self-confidence of an Arcadian dream. However, four years prior to its opening in 1969 it was just an idea — plus a 30x40 foot wave tank built by construction engineer Phil Dexter. Today we take artificial wave beaches more or less for granted, but at the time Dexter’s Big Surf ranked along with the best of the arid land utopias conjured out of a barren wilderness: Taliesin, Biltmore, Arcosanti. Under the wide aegis of the city of Phoenix, Big Surf adds its own form of Waikiki picturesque into the alchemy of surf culture, water engineering, and the notion of a truly endless summer.
When Big Surf first opened it boasted a five-foot wave every minute, but over the years the waves have become smaller and less regular, perhaps synonymous with its diminishing status among many of today’s grander artificial wave systems. Of course, surfers can still appreciate its magnitude; the system’s pumps draw 50,000 gallons of water into giant cisterns within the wall, and when the wave comes it is triggered in booming flush as gates opens and the wave forms over a concrete baffle below the water line.

See also: 

social-pool.com
http://www.social-pool.com/

wandrlust:

Big Surf

Arizona’s Big Surf is one of those projects that belong to the era of post-war boosterism and the unassailable self-confidence of an Arcadian dream. However, four years prior to its opening in 1969 it was just an idea — plus a 30x40 foot wave tank built by construction engineer Phil Dexter. Today we take artificial wave beaches more or less for granted, but at the time Dexter’s Big Surf ranked along with the best of the arid land utopias conjured out of a barren wilderness: Taliesin, Biltmore, Arcosanti. Under the wide aegis of the city of Phoenix, Big Surf adds its own form of Waikiki picturesque into the alchemy of surf culture, water engineering, and the notion of a truly endless summer.

When Big Surf first opened it boasted a five-foot wave every minute, but over the years the waves have become smaller and less regular, perhaps synonymous with its diminishing status among many of today’s grander artificial wave systems. Of course, surfers can still appreciate its magnitude; the system’s pumps draw 50,000 gallons of water into giant cisterns within the wall, and when the wave comes it is triggered in booming flush as gates opens and the wave forms over a concrete baffle below the water line.